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dc.contributorXu, D. H.en_US
dc.creatorHamwieh, Aladdinen_US
dc.date2008-12-01en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-12T00:14:01Z
dc.date.available2020-11-12T00:14:01Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/a8c87e3490be93e3f01ed64087b2269cen_US
dc.identifier.citationAladdin Hamwieh, D. H. Xu. (1/12/2008). Conserved salt tolerance quantitative trait locus (QTL) in wild and cultivated soybeans. Breeding Science, 58 (4).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/12024
dc.description.abstractIn the present study, we investigated salt tolerance heredity in wild soybean, Glycine soja Sieb & Zucc., and compared the salt tolerance quantitative trait locus (QTL) of G. soja with that of Glycine max (L.) Merr. An F-2 population (n=225) derived from a cross between the salt sensitive soybean cultivar Jackson (P1548657) and a salt-tolerant wild soybean accession (JWS156-1) was used. Evaluation of salt tolerance in the seedling stage was carried out in hydroponic culture with half-strength Hoagland and Arnon nutrient solution containing 120 mM NaCl. Visual ratings of symptoms based on leaf scorching and chlorophyll content (SPAD value) were taken for each plant 20 days after salt treatment. Both traits showed continuous distribution; however, salt-tolerant plants (i.e. plants with a high salt tolerance rating (STR) and SPAD value) were predominant. QTL analysis revealed a major salt-tolerant QTL with a large dominant effect, which accounted for 68.7% of the total variance of the STR scale, on the soybean linkage group N. Our results indicated that the salt tolerance QTL confers a large dominant effect over salt sensitivity and that the salt tolerance QTL is conserved in both wild and Cultivated soybeans.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherJapanese Society of Breedingen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-4.0en_US
dc.sourceBreeding Science;58,(2008)en_US
dc.subjectqtlen_US
dc.subjectSoya beanen_US
dc.titleConserved salt tolerance quantitative trait locus (QTL) in wild and cultivated soybeansen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.creator.idHamwieh, Aladdin: 0000-0001-6060-5560en_US
cg.creator.ID-typeORCIDen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsalt toleranceen_US
cg.subject.agrovocglycine sojaen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.centerJapan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences - JIRCASen_US
cg.contributor.funderInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.projectCommunication and Documentation Information Services (CODIS)en_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.coverage.regionEastern Asiaen_US
cg.coverage.countryJPen_US
cg.contactxudh@jircas.affrc.go.jpen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1270/jsbbs.58.355en_US
dc.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
mel.impact-factor1.865en_US


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