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dc.contributorRischkowsky, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributorBirner, Reginaen_US
dc.contributorWollny, Clemensen_US
dc.creatorDossa, Lucen_US
dc.date2008-04-10en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-12T00:23:46Z
dc.date.available2020-11-12T00:23:46Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/5dca776774f805173d0b579fe54a696cen_US
dc.identifier.citationLuc Dossa, Barbara Rischkowsky, Regina Birner, Clemens Wollny. (10/4/2008). Socio-economic determinants of keeping goats and sheep by rural people in southern Benin. Agriculture and Human Values, 25 (4).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/12025
dc.description.abstractAn understanding of factors influencing the decision of rural people to keep sheep and/or goats is crucial when formulating technologies and policies that support village-based small ruminant production. The knowledge of such factors will also improve assessment of impact intervention strategies on the livelihoods of rural people. Structured questionnaires administered in 228 households were used to study the ownership patterns of small ruminants in southern Benin. The ownership of goats was higher (91%) than sheep (35%) because goats are not affected by any ethnic or cultural restrictions. Goats are also perceived to be a less risky to invest into compared to sheep. Women represented 71% of the keepers of goats. Predictive models of ownership were developed using logistic regression. The results showed that younger household members (p < 0.05) especially young women (60%) are more likely to own small ruminants. Owners of small ruminants are less likely to be involved in off-farm activities and would often have no access to credit facilities. Gender, ethnicity, and perception of risk associated with species are the major factors affecting people's choice of species. These findings highlight the financing and insurance roles that small ruminants, particularly goats, are playing in the study area. In order to develop suitable technologies and formulate policies to improve productivity and enhance livelihoods, the constraints to goat production need to be identified, and the local knowledge of the keepers should be investigated.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer (part of Springer Nature)en_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-4.0en_US
dc.sourceAgriculture and Human Values;25,(2008)en_US
dc.subjectsmallholderen_US
dc.subjectsocio-economicsen_US
dc.subjectownership patternsen_US
dc.titleSocio-economic determinants of keeping goats and sheep by rural people in southern Beninen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.creator.idRischkowsky, Barbara: 0000-0002-0035-471Xen_US
cg.creator.ID-typeORCIDen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsheepen_US
cg.subject.agrovocgoatsen_US
cg.subject.agrovocrural developmenten_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.centerGeorg-August-Universitat Gottingen - Uni-Goettingenen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Food Policy Research Institute - IFPRIen_US
cg.contributor.centerBingen Technical University of Applied Sciences - TH Bingenen_US
cg.contributor.funderInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.projectCommunication and Documentation Information Services (CODIS)en_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.coverage.regionWestern Africaen_US
cg.coverage.countryBJen_US
cg.contacthdossa@gwdg.deen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10460-008-9138-9en_US
dc.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
mel.impact-factor2.442en_US


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