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dc.contributorOster, Jimen_US
dc.creatorQadir, Manzooren_US
dc.date2004-05-24en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-13T22:41:11Z
dc.date.available2021-01-13T22:41:11Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/dspace/limiteden_US
dc.identifier.citationManzoor Qadir, Jim Oster. (24/5/2004). Crop and irrigation management strategies for saline-sodic soils and waters aimed at environmentally sustainable agriculture. Science of the Total Environment, 323 (1-3), pp. 1-19.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/12343
dc.description.abstractIrrigation has long played a key role in feeding the expanding world population and is expected to play a still greater role in the future. As supplies of good-quality irrigation water are expected to decrease in several regions due to increased municipal–industrial–agricultural competition, available freshwater supplies need to be used more efficiently. In addition, reliance on the use and reuse of saline and/or sodic drainage waters, generated by irrigated agriculture, seems inevitable for irrigation. The same applies to salt-affected soils, which occupy more than 20% of the irrigated lands, and warrant attention for efficient, inexpensive and environmentally acceptable management. Technologically and from a management perspective, a couple of strategies have shown the potential to improve crop production under irrigated agriculture while minimizing the adverse environmental impacts. The first strategy, vegetative bioremediation—a plant-assisted reclamation approach—relies on growing appropriate plant species that can tolerate ambient soil salinity and sodicity levels during reclamation of salt-affected soils. A variety of plant species of agricultural significance have been found to be effective in sustainable reclamation of calcareous and moderately sodic and saline-sodic soils. The second strategy fosters dedicating soils to crop production systems where saline and/or sodic waters predominate and their disposal options are limited. Production systems based on salt-tolerant plant species using drainage waters may be sustainable with the potential of transforming such waters from an environmental burden into an economic asset. Such a strategy would encourage the disposal of drainage waters within the irrigated regions where they are generated rather than exporting these waters to other regions via discharge into main irrigation canals, local streams, or rivers. Being economically and environmentally sustainable, these strategies could be the key to future agricultural and economic growth and social wealth in regions where salt-affected soils exist and/or where saline-sodic drainage waters are generated.en_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier (12 months)en_US
dc.rightsCopyrighted; all rights reserveden_US
dc.sourceScience of the Total Environment;323,(2003) Pagination 1,19en_US
dc.subjectdrainage water reuseen_US
dc.subjectsalt-tolerant plantsen_US
dc.subjectphytomeliorationen_US
dc.subjectmarginal-quality watersen_US
dc.subjectcrop production systemsen_US
dc.titleCrop and irrigation management strategies for saline-sodic soils and waters aimed at environmentally sustainable agricultureen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.centerUniversity of California-Riverside - UCRen_US
cg.contributor.funderInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.projectCommunication and Documentation Information Services (CODIS)en_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-dateTimelessen_US
cg.coverage.regionGlobalen_US
cg.contactManzoor.Qadir@unu.eduen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2003.10.012en_US
dc.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US
mel.impact-factor6.551en_US


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