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dc.contributorSarker, Ashutoshen_US
dc.contributorAshraf, M.en_US
dc.creatorErskine, Williamen_US
dc.date2011-03-01en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-14T23:51:42Z
dc.date.available2021-01-14T23:51:42Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/dspace/limiteden_US
dc.identifier.citationWilliam Erskine, Ashutosh Sarker, M. Ashraf. (1/3/2011). Reconstructing an ancient bottleneck of the movement of the lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris) into South Asia. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution, 58, pp. 373-381.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/12365
dc.description.abstractCrop movement often leads to genetic bottlenecks. The lentil was domesticated in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Dissemination from highland Afghanistan into the Indo-Gangetic Plain, where it is of major importance today, caused a founder effect creating a genetic bottleneck. To understand the process and assist breeders with broadening the consequent narrow genetic base, this study re-constructs the founder effect by a re-examination of historical world germplasm evaluations at an intermediate elevation site in Pakistan-Islamabad, and at a low elevation site-Faisalabad representative of the Indo-Gangetic Plain. At Islamabad 72% of landrace accessions of an Afghan origin did not flower and the remaining Afghan accessions were among the latest flowering accessions in the world germplasm collection. At Faisalabad late flowering accessions produced low yields with each week's delay in flowering giving a yield loss of 9.2%. Prehistorically Afghan lentil germplasm probably harboured recessive alleles for time to flower, possibly from introgression with wild lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. orientalis) in Afghanistan, which were then cyclically recombined and selected for as part of the dissemination process into the Indo-Gangetic Plain.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer (part of Springer Nature)en_US
dc.rightsCopyrighted; all rights reserveden_US
dc.sourceGenetic Resources and Crop Evolution;58,(2010) Pagination 373,381en_US
dc.subjectdisseminationen_US
dc.subjectbottlenecken_US
dc.subjectfounder effecten_US
dc.titleReconstructing an ancient bottleneck of the movement of the lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris) into South Asiaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.creator.idSarker, Ashutosh: 0000-0002-9074-4876en_US
cg.creator.ID-typeORCIDen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsouth asiaen_US
cg.subject.agrovoclentilsen_US
cg.subject.agrovoclens culinarisen_US
cg.contributor.centerThe University of Western Australia, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, Centre for Legumes in Mediterranean Agriculture - UWA - FoNAS - CLIMAen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.centerNuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology - NIAB Pakistanen_US
cg.contributor.funderInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.projectCommunication and Documentation Information Services (CODIS)en_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-dateTimelessen_US
cg.coverage.regionGlobalen_US
cg.contactwilliam.erskine@uwa.edu.auen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10722-010-9582-4en_US
dc.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US
mel.impact-factor1.071en_US


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