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dc.contributorKusmenoglu, I.en_US
dc.contributorErskine, Williamen_US
dc.creatorHamdi, A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-01T23:52:01Z
dc.date.available2021-04-01T23:52:01Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/dspace/limiteden_US
dc.identifier.citationA. Hamdi, I. Kusmenoglu, William Erskine. (1/2/1996). Sources of winter hardiness in wild lentil. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution, 43, pp. 63-67.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/12802
dc.description.abstractIn high altitude areas (> c. 850 m elevation) in west Asia and north Africa, lentil (Lens culinaris) is grown as a spring crop to avoid severe winter cold. But late fall-sown lentil with winter hardiness has higher yield potential in these areas. In this study a total of 245 accessions of wild lentil, 10 of cultivated lentil and three accessions of Vicia montbretii (syn. L. montbretii) were evaluated for winter hardiness in Syria and Turkey during the 1991/92 season. The absolute minimum temperatures were -16 degrees C in Syria and -18.9 degrees C in Turkey and the susceptible indicators were killed at both locations showing that the cold was sufficient for screening. Although winter hardiness was assessed as percentage of survived plants in Syria and as a visual damage rating on a 1-9 scale in Turkey, there was agreement between the winter hardiness ratings with a correlation of r = -0.56, P < 0.001. Accessions of L. culinaris ssp. orientalis exhibited the highest level of winter hardiness, on average; whereas accessions of L. nigricans ssp. ervoides were the most susceptible. Correlations revealed that winter hardiness was concentrated among accessions originating from high elevation areas.en_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer (part of Springer Nature)en_US
dc.sourceGenetic Resources and Crop Evolution;43,(1995) Pagination 63-67en_US
dc.subjectlens sspen_US
dc.subjectwild lentilen_US
dc.subjectWild Lentilen_US
dc.titleSources of winter hardiness in wild lentilen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dcterms.available1995-02-14en_US
dcterms.extent63-67en_US
dcterms.issued1996-02-01en_US
cg.subject.agrovocgermplasmen_US
cg.subject.agrovoccold toleranceen_US
cg.subject.agrovocwinter hardinessen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.centerMinistry of Agriculture and forestry, Field Crops Central Research Institute - TARIMORMAN - CRIFCen_US
cg.contributor.funderInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.projectCommunication and Documentation Information Services (CODIS)en_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-dateTimelessen_US
cg.contactunknown1@unknown.comen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00126942en_US
cg.isijournalISI Journalen_US
dc.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US
mel.impact-factor1.071en_US
cg.issn0925-9864en_US
cg.issn1573-5109en_US
cg.journalGenetic Resources and Crop Evolutionen_US
cg.volume43en_US


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