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dc.contributorAyantunde, Augustineen_US
dc.contributorDangoma, Abdouen_US
dc.creatorAmole, Tundeen_US
dc.date2016-02-01en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-29T03:41:20Z
dc.date.available2016-06-29T03:41:20Z
dc.identifierhttps://cgspace.cgiar.org/handle/handle.net/10568/72736en_US
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/OxAhVkT6en_US
dc.identifier.citationTunde Amole, Augustine Ayantunde, Abdou Dangoma. (1/2/2016). Least-cost rations for sheep fattening: A manual for livestock farmers and extension workers in the West African Sahel. Nairobi, Kenya: International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/4828
dc.description.abstractSheep fattening is an increasingly important economic activity in the West African Sahel, particularly in and around Tabaski, the Islamic festival of Eid-al-Kabir (Ayantunde et al. 2008). The low level of initial investment, rapid turnover rate, the high degree of social acceptance and easy access to the market make sheep fattening extremely attractive to poor farmers, including women. It entails feeding young sheep for a short period, leading to a 30–40% increase in edible carcass yield. The main strategy is to fatten young, lean male sheep, born on-farm or, more frequently, purchased on the open market, over a two–three-month period. Fattening is increasingly providing opportunities to rural and suburban Sahelian communities to improve household food security and incomes. Sheep farmers traditionally feed their animals with whatever food that is available: feed waste when available and underfeeding in times of shortages. Consequently, growth rates in traditional sheep fattening have remained low and largely unprofitable. Many studies have been conducted to develop alternative feeding strategies to make sheep fattening profitable. This manual provides simple and tested practical guidelines for livestock farmers and extension workers on least cost ration based on locally available feed resources for sheep fattening. It contains details on feeding and management options that can be applied by small-scale producers. Other key issues addressed in the manual include housing, purchase of feed, general hygiene and the handling of animals.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherInternational Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)en_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.titleLeast-cost rations for sheep fattening: A manual for livestock farmers and extension workers in the West African Sahelen_US
dc.typeManualen_US
cg.subject.agrovocforageen_US
cg.subject.agrovoclivestocken_US
cg.subject.agrovocsmall ruminantsen_US
cg.subject.agrovocanimal feedingen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Livestock Research Institute - ILRIen_US
cg.contributor.centerInstitut National de la Recherche Agronomique du Niger - INRANen_US
cg.contributor.crpCRP on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.contributor.funderNot Applicableen_US
cg.coverage.regionEastern Africaen_US
cg.coverage.countryKEen_US
cg.contactT.Amole@cgiar.orgen_US
dc.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US


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