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dc.contributorSahrawat, Kanwar Lalen_US
dc.contributorPuppala, Naveenen_US
dc.contributorOrtiz, Rodomiroen_US
dc.creatorDwivedi, Sangamen_US
dc.date2014-07-31en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-09T21:22:44Z
dc.date.available2017-01-09T21:22:44Z
dc.identifierhttp://oar.icrisat.org/id/eprint/8591en_US
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/Qc44UIgven_US
dc.identifier.citationSangam Dwivedi, Kanwar Lal Sahrawat, Naveen Puppala, Rodomiro Ortiz. (31/7/2014). Plant prebiotics and human health: Biotechnology to breed prebiotic-rich nutritious food crops. Electronic Journal of Biotechnology, 17(5), pp. 238-245.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/5392
dc.description.abstractMicrobiota in the gut play essential roles in human health. Prebiotics are non-digestible complex carbohydrates that are fermented in the colon, yielding energy and short chain fatty acids, and selectively promote the growth of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillae in the gastro-intestinal tract. Fructans and inulin are the best-characterized plant prebiotics. Many vegetable, root and tuber crops as well as some fruit crops are the best-known sources of prebiotic carbohydrates, while the prebiotic-rich grain crops include barley, chickpea, lentil, lupin, and wheat. Some prebiotic-rich crop germplasm have been reported in barley, chickpea, lentil, wheat, yacon, and Jerusalem artichoke. A few major quantitative trait loci and gene-based markers associated with high fructan are known in wheat. More targeted search in genebanks using reduced subsets (representing diversity in germplasm) is needed to identify accessions with prebiotic carbohydrates. Transgenic maize, potato and sugarcane with high fructan, with no adverse effects on plant development, have been bred, which suggests that it is feasible to introduce fructan biosynthesis pathways in crops to produce health-imparting prebiotics. Developing prebiotic-rich and super nutritious crops will alleviate the widespread malnutrition and promote human health. A paradigm shift in breeding program is needed to achieve this goal and to ensure that newly-bred crop cultivars are nutritious, safe and health promoting.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.sourceElectronic Journal of Biotechnology;17,(2014) Pagination 238,245en_US
dc.subjectgut microbiotaen_US
dc.subjectnon-digestible fibersen_US
dc.subjecttransgeneen_US
dc.subjecthuman healthen_US
dc.titlePlant prebiotics and human health: Biotechnology to breed prebiotic-rich nutritious food cropsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.subject.agrovocgermplasmen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics - ICRISATen_US
cg.contributor.centerNew Mexico State University, Agricultural Science Center at Clovis - NMSU-ASCen_US
cg.contributor.centerSwedish University of Agricultural Sciences - SLUen_US
cg.contributor.crpCRP on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.contributor.funderNot Applicableen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-date2018-07-31en_US
cg.coverage.regionSouthern Asiaen_US
cg.coverage.countryINen_US
cg.contactrodomiro.ortiz@slu.seen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejbt.2014.07.004en_US
dc.identifier.statusLimited accessen_US
mel.impact-factor1.403en_US


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