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dc.contributorSavadogo, Patriceen_US
dc.creatorScheiter, Simonen_US
dc.date2016-03-04en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-09T00:31:01Z
dc.date.available2017-02-09T00:31:01Z
dc.identifierhttp://oar.icrisat.org/id/eprint/9475en_US
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/Q0s6iRqRen_US
dc.identifier.citationSimon Scheiter, Patrice Savadogo. (4/3/2016). Ecosystem management can mitigate vegetation shifts induced byclimate change in West Africa. Ecological Modelling, 332, pp. 19-27.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/5634
dc.description.abstracttThe welfare of people in the tropics and sub-tropics strongly depends on goods and services that savannaecosystems supply, such as food and livestock production, fuel wood, and climate regulation. Flows ofthese services are strongly influenced by climate, land use and their interactions. Savannas cover c. 20%of the Earth’s land surface and changes in the structure and dynamics of savanna vegetation may stronglyinfluence local people’s living conditions, as well as the climate system and global biogeochemical cycles.In this study, we use a dynamic vegetation model, the aDGVM, to explore interactive effects of climateand land use on the vegetation structure and distribution of West African savannas under current andanticipated future environmental conditions. We parameterized the model for West African savannas andextended it by including sub-models to simulate fire management, grazing, and wood cutting. The modelprojects that under future climate without human land use impacts, large savanna areas would shifttoward more wood dominated vegetation due to CO2fertilization effects, increased water use efficiencyand decreased fire activity. However, land use activities could maintain desired vegetation states thatensure fluxes of important ecosystem services, even under anticipated future conditions. Ecosystemmanagement can mitigate climate change impacts on vegetation and delay or avoid undesired vegetationshifts. The results highlight the effects of land use on the future distribution and dynamics of savannas.The identification of management strategies is essential to maintain important ecosystem services underfuture conditions in savannas worldwide.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.sourceEcological Modelling;332,(2016) Pagination 19,27en_US
dc.subjectadgvmen_US
dc.subjectfireen_US
dc.subjectsavannaen_US
dc.subjectwood cuttingen_US
dc.titleEcosystem management can mitigate vegetation shifts induced byclimate change in West Africaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.creator.idSavadogo, Patrice: 0000-0001-6997-424Xen_US
cg.creator.ID-typeORCIDen_US
cg.subject.agrovocclimate changeen_US
cg.subject.agrovocland useen_US
cg.contributor.centerSenckenberg Society for Nature Research, Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre - Senckenberg - BiK-Fen_US
cg.contributor.centerWorld Agroforestry Center - ICRAFen_US
cg.contributor.crpCRP on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.contributor.funderNot Applicableen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-date2020-03-04en_US
cg.coverage.regionWestern Africaen_US
cg.coverage.countryBFen_US
cg.contactsimon.scheiter@senckenberg.deen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2016.03.022en_US
dc.identifier.statusLimited accessen_US
mel.impact-factor2.275en_US


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