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dc.contributorAhmed, Awadelkarim H.en_US
dc.contributorMiller, Stanley F.en_US
dc.contributorGlenn, D.Michaelen_US
dc.creatorNordblom, Thomas Len_US
dc.date2003-10-02en_US
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-21T23:21:14Z
dc.date.available2022-02-21T23:21:14Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/dspace/limiteden_US
dc.identifier.citationThomas L Nordblom, Awadelkarim H. Ahmed, Stanley F. Miller, D. Michael Glenn. (2/10/2003). Long-run evaluation of fertilization strategies for dryland wheat in Northcentral Oregon: Simulation analysis. Agricultural Systems, 18 (3), pp. 133-153.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/67138
dc.description.abstractFarmers commonly apply fixed ‘blind’ quantities of nitrogen fertilizer during the fallow or at seeding in rainfed winter wheat-fallow systems in Northcentral Oregon, an area characterized by high year-to-year variation in growing conditions. Knowing crop response to available N depends on growing conditions; some farmers apply additional N during the crop season in years of good rains. A simulation model was designed to estimate crop response functions for each fallow-crop cycle in a sequence of 59 harvests, based on monthly precipitation and temperature records from 1917 to 1976 at Moro, Oregon. Five strategies, blind fallow applications (BF), blind seeding time applications (BS), calculated crop season applications (CC), and combinations (BF + CC) and (BS + CC), were each evaluated across this long sequence of years under three cost/price scenarios. Calculated applications, adjusted to particular growth and market conditions, resulted in highest average profits with the lowest coefficients of variation.en_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Massonen_US
dc.rightsCopyrighted; all rights reserveden_US
dc.sourceAgricultural Systems;18,(2003) Pagination 133,153en_US
dc.subjectdryland wheaten_US
dc.subjectfertilization strategiesen_US
dc.subjectWheaten_US
dc.titleLong-run evaluation of fertilization strategies for dryland wheat in Northcentral Oregon: Simulation analysisen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.subject.agrovocwheaten_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.centerUniversity of Geziraen_US
cg.contributor.centerOregon State University - OSU United Statesen_US
cg.contributor.centerUnited States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service - Appalachian Fruit Research Stationen_US
cg.contributor.funderInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.projectCommunication and Documentation Information Services (CODIS)en_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-dateTimelessen_US
cg.coverage.regionNorthern Americaen_US
cg.coverage.countryUSen_US
cg.contactunknown400@unknown.comen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0308-521X(85)90028-9en_US
dc.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US
mel.impact-factor5.370en_US


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