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dc.creatorICARDA, Communication Teamen_US
dc.date.accessioned2023-01-11T00:36:26Z
dc.date.available2023-01-11T00:36:26Z
dc.identifierhttps://icarda.org/media/news/how-livestock-can-empower-women-farmersen_US
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/21dcb327cf16e17419bb6070bccc3ea8en_US
dc.identifier.citationCommunication Team ICARDA. (23/12/2022). How livestock can empower women farmers. URL: https://icarda.org/media/news/how-livestock-can-empower-women-farmersen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/67896
dc.description.abstractIn the Global South, livestock has strong empowerment potential for millions of women by providing protein-rich food for home consumption and sale, strengthening their role as stakeholders. However, in many rural communities, gender norms shape how household members manage and share livestock and their benefits, often in ways that disadvantage women and girls. For example, women graze small livestock species, while men own larger, more profitable animals. Cultural norms can also forbid women from farm labor and may limit their access to land and fodder, restricting their ability to develop their livestock holdings and farm independently. Dr. Dina Najjar, ICARDA’s Gender Scientist, has published a paper that explores women’s experiences with livestock-based livelihoods and technological innovations by studying 73 village cases from 13 countries. The study follows a gender empowerment framework that analyzes the recognition of women as livestock keepers, their access to resources and opportunities, and their ability to make decisions. The paper finds that improved livestock breeds and associated innovations, such as fodder choppers or training, provide women with significant benefits but may double their burden. Another challenge is that even if the local community recognizes women as livestock keepers, this recognition may not pass upward among external institutions. The study demonstrates that realizing livestock empowerment potential for women can constitute important avenues for their empowerment and is necessary for sustainable livestock development. But for this to happen, rural communities, and higher institutions such as NGOs and extension workers, must optimize gender-equitable opportunities, and development partners must design interventions that facilitate gender-transformative change.en_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA)en_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-SA-4.0en_US
dc.subjectpoverty reduction, livelihoods and jobsen_US
dc.titleHow livestock can empower women farmersen_US
dc.typeBlogen_US
dcterms.available2022-12-23en_US
cg.subject.agrovocgoal 1 no povertyen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.crpResilient Agrifood Systems - RAFSen_US
cg.contributor.funderCGIAR Trust Funden_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contactcodis@cgiar.orgen_US
dc.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
cg.subject.sdgSDG 1 - No povertyen_US
cg.subject.actionAreaResilient Agrifood Systemsen_US
cg.subject.impactAreaPoverty reduction, livelihoods and jobsen_US
cg.contributor.initiativeSustainable Animal Productivityen_US


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