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dc.contributorLeiser, Willmaren_US
dc.contributorBeggi, Francescaen_US
dc.contributorHerrmann, Ludgeren_US
dc.contributorVadez, Vincenten_US
dc.contributorRattunde, Freden_US
dc.contributorWeltzien, Evaen_US
dc.contributorHash, Charlesen_US
dc.contributorBuerkert, Andreasen_US
dc.contributorHaussmann, Bettinaen_US
dc.creatorGemenet, Dorcusen_US
dc.date2016-09-23en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-18T12:13:04Z
dc.date.available2017-04-18T12:13:04Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/M2owYtdxen_US
dc.identifier.citationDorcus Gemenet, Willmar Leiser, Francesca Beggi, Ludger Herrmann, Vincent Vadez, Fred Rattunde, Eva Weltzien, Charles Hash, Andreas Buerkert, Bettina Haussmann. (23/9/2016). Overcoming Phosphorus Deficiency in West African Pearl Millet and Sorghum Production Systems: Promising Options for Crop Improvement. Frontiers in Plant Science, 7.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/6817
dc.description.abstractWest Africa (WA) is among the most food insecure regions. Rapid human population growth and stagnating crop yields greatly contribute to this fact. Poor soil fertility, especially low plant available phosphorus (P) is constraining food production in the region. P-fertilizer use in WA is among the lowest in the world due to inaccessibility and high prices, often unaffordable to resource-poor subsistence farmers. This article provides an overview of soil P-deficiency in WA and opportunities to overcome it by exploiting sorghum and pearl millet genetic diversity. The topic is examined from the perspectives of plant breeding, soil science, plant physiology, plant nutrition, and agronomy, thereby referring to recent results obtained in a joint interdisciplinary research project, and reported literature. Specific objectives are to summarize: (1) The global problem of P scarcity and how it will affect WA farmers; (2) Soil P dynamics in WA soils; (3) Plant responses to P deficiency; (4) Opportunities to breed for improved crop adaptation to P-limited conditions; (5) Challenges and trade-offs for improving sorghum and pearl millet adaptation to low-P conditions in WA; and (6) Systems approaches to address soil P-deficiency in WA. Sorghum and pearl millet in WA exhibit highly significant genetic variation for P-uptake efficiency, P-utilization efficiency, and grain yield under P-limited conditions indicating the possibility of breeding P-efficient varieties. Direct selection under P-limited conditions was more efficient than indirect selection under high-P conditions. Combining P-uptake and P-utilization efficiency is recommendable for WA to avoid further soil mining. Genomic regions responsible for P-uptake, P-utilization efficiency, and grain yield under low-P have been identified in WA sorghum and pearl millet, and marker-assisted selection could be possible once these genomic regions are validated. Developing P-efficient genotypes may not, however, be a sustainable solution in itself in the long-term without replenishing the P removed from the system in harvested produce. We therefore propose the use of integrated soil fertility management and systems-oriented management such as enhanced crop-tree-livestock integration in combination with P-use-efficiency-improved varieties. Recycling P from animal bones, human excreta and urine are also possible approaches toward a partially closed and efficient P cycle in WA.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.sourceFrontiers in Plant Science;7,(2016)en_US
dc.subjectSorghumen_US
dc.titleOvercoming Phosphorus Deficiency in West African Pearl Millet and Sorghum Production Systems: Promising Options for Crop Improvementen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.creator.idGemenet, Dorcus: 0000-0003-4901-1694en_US
cg.creator.idVadez, Vincent: 0000-0003-2014-0281en_US
cg.creator.ID-typeORCIDen_US
cg.creator.ID-typeORCIDen_US
cg.subject.agrovoccrop improvementen_US
cg.subject.agrovocproduction systemsen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Potato Center - CIPen_US
cg.contributor.centerUniversity of Hohenheim - UHOHen_US
cg.contributor.centerBioversity International - Bioversityen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics - ICRISATen_US
cg.contributor.centerUniversity of Kassel - UKen_US
cg.contributor.centerUniversity of Hohenheim, Institute of Plant Breeding, Seed Science and Population Geneticsen_US
cg.contributor.crpCGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.contributor.funderNot Applicableen_US
cg.coverage.regionWestern Africaen_US
cg.coverage.regionMiddle Africaen_US
cg.coverage.countryBJen_US
cg.coverage.countryBFen_US
cg.coverage.countryCIen_US
cg.coverage.countryGMen_US
cg.coverage.countryGHen_US
cg.coverage.countryGNen_US
cg.coverage.countryGWen_US
cg.coverage.countryLRen_US
cg.coverage.countryMLen_US
cg.coverage.countryMRen_US
cg.coverage.countryNEen_US
cg.coverage.countryNGen_US
cg.coverage.countrySHen_US
cg.coverage.countrySTen_US
cg.coverage.countrySNen_US
cg.coverage.countrySLen_US
cg.coverage.countryTGen_US
cg.coverage.countryCVen_US
cg.contactbettina.haussmann@uni-hohenheim.deen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2016.01389en_US
dc.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
mel.impact-factor4.495en_US


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