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dc.contributorlucas, R.J.en_US
dc.contributorEdwards, G. R.en_US
dc.creatorAtes, Serkanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-21T16:04:26Z
dc.date.available2017-06-21T16:04:26Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/dspace/limiteden_US
dc.identifier.citationSerkan Ates, R. J. lucas, G. R. Edwards. (27/9/2015). Stocking rate effects on liveweight gain of ewes and their twin lambs when grazing subterranean clover–perennial grass pastures. Grass and Forage Science, 70 (3), pp. 418-427.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/7084
dc.description.abstractTwo grazing experiments were conducted on nonirrigated tall fescue–subterranean clover and cocksfoot– subterranean pastures subject to summer-dry conditions in Canterbury, New Zealand, to measure the effect of low (8 3–10 ewes and their twin lambs ha 1) vs. high (13 9–20 ewes and their twin lambs ha 1) stocking rates (SR) on lamb and ewe liveweight gain in spring. In tall fescue–subterranean clover pasture, lambs grew faster at low (374 g per head d 1) than high (307 g per head d 1) SR, but total liveweight gain per ha was greater at high (12 3 kg ha 1 d 1) than low (7 5 kg ha 1 d 1) SR. In successive years in spring in cocksfoot–subterranean clover pastures, lambs grew faster at low (327, 385 g per head d 1) than high (253, 285 g per head d 1) SR but total liveweight gain per ha was greater at high (7 26, 7 91 kg ha 1) than low (5 43, 6 38 kg ha 1) SR. These studies indicate that in summer- dry areas, subterranean clover-based pastures will support high twin lamb growth rates in spring, with lower SR leading to higher lamb growth rates and more lambs reaching slaughter weights before the onset of dry conditionsen_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherWiley: 12 monthsen_US
dc.sourceGrass and Forage Science;70,(2015) Pagination 418-427en_US
dc.subjectdryland pasturesen_US
dc.subjectlamb liveweight gainen_US
dc.subjectlegume contenten_US
dc.subjectsheep grazingen_US
dc.titleStocking rate effects on liveweight gain of ewes and their twin lambs when grazing subterranean clover–perennial grass pasturesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dcterms.available2015-09-27en_US
dcterms.extent418-427en_US
cg.creator.idAtes, Serkan: 0000-0001-6825-3248en_US
cg.subject.agrovocstocking rateen_US
cg.subject.agrovoccocksfooten_US
cg.subject.agrovocsubterranean cloveren_US
cg.subject.agrovoctall fescueen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.centerLincoln Universityen_US
cg.contributor.funderInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.projectCommunication and Documentation Information Services (CODIS)en_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-date2115-09-27en_US
cg.coverage.regionAustralia and New Zealanden_US
cg.coverage.countryNZen_US
cg.contacts.ates@cgiar.orgen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1111/gfs.12143en_US
cg.isijournalISI Journalen_US
dc.identifier.statusLimited accessen_US
mel.impact-factor1.617en_US
cg.issn0142-5242en_US
cg.journalGrass and Forage Scienceen_US
cg.issue3en_US
cg.volume70en_US


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