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dc.creatorOjiewo, Chrisen_US
dc.date2017-04-04en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-15T05:48:27Z
dc.date.available2017-08-15T05:48:27Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/MSVdxtjBen_US
dc.identifier.citationChris Ojiewo. (4/4/2017). Conduct agronomic studies for optimization of nutrient requirements of 2-3 released chickpea varieties.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/7376
dc.description.abstractSummarizing the effect of rehizobium, location and varieties on the biological and economic responses of chickpea as summarized in the Tables below is inspiring. The results indicated that chickpea yield can be improved through proper rhizobium inoculation as different rhizobial strains had a pronounced effect on grain yield, yield components, nodulation, total N uptake, and amount of nitrogen fixed in the shoot part of the plant as compared to non-inoculated treatments. Indigenous rhizobium strain ICRE-05 and ICRE-03 was found to have a more significant effect on most of the studied parameters, followed by ICRE-025. These results indicated that the indigenous chickpea rhizobial strains used in this study are better adapted to the soil environment and survived in adequate numbers as compared to the commercial inoculants EAL-029. ICRE-03, ICRE-05 and ICRE-025 and EAL-029. These three strains not only increased the chickpea yields but also enhanced the shoot nitrogen content which in turn could increase protein content of the seed. This is particularly important in that these strains could be used for inoculation to increase the number of inoculants of chickpea in the study area of the country and hence could be further studied on a wider range of soils to evaluate the likelihood of its successful incorporation into the existing cropping system.en_US
dc.formatDOCXen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-4.0en_US
dc.subjectagronomicsen_US
dc.subjectChickpeaen_US
dc.titleConduct agronomic studies for optimization of nutrient requirements of 2-3 released chickpea varietiesen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics - ICRISATen_US
cg.contributor.crpCGIAR Research Program on Grain Legumes - GLen_US
cg.contributor.funderNot Applicableen_US
cg.coverage.regionSouthern Asiaen_US
cg.coverage.regionWestern Africaen_US
cg.coverage.regionEastern Africaen_US
cg.coverage.regionSouth-Eastern Asiaen_US
cg.coverage.countryBDen_US
cg.coverage.countryBFen_US
cg.coverage.countryETen_US
cg.coverage.countryGHen_US
cg.coverage.countryINen_US
cg.coverage.countryMWen_US
cg.coverage.countryMLen_US
cg.coverage.countryMZen_US
cg.coverage.countryMMen_US
cg.coverage.countryNGen_US
cg.coverage.countryTZen_US
cg.coverage.countryUGen_US
cg.coverage.countryVNen_US
cg.coverage.countryZMen_US
cg.coverage.countryZWen_US
cg.contactC.Ojiewo@cgiar.orgen_US
dc.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US


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