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dc.contributorBruggeman, Adrianaen_US
dc.contributorTurkelboom, Francisen_US
dc.creatorTubeileh, Ashrafen_US
dc.date2009-10-31en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-01T22:07:30Z
dc.date.available2018-09-01T22:07:30Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/dspace/limiteden_US
dc.identifierhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10668-008-9167-yen_US
dc.identifier.citationAshraf Tubeileh, Adriana Bruggeman, Francis Turkelboom. (31/10/2009). Effect of water harvesting on growth of young olive trees in degraded Syrian dryland. Environment, Development and Sustainability, 11 (5), pp. 1073-1090.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/8357
dc.description.abstractOlive (Olea europaea L.) is a drought-tolerant tree which is usually grown in areas with a Mediterranean climate that receive >350 mm of annual rainfall. However, olive growing in Syria has recently expanded into drier areas (200–300 mm annual rainfall) where irrigation resources are limited. This study, carried out between November 2002 and October 2005, aimed to investigate the response of a little known Syrian drought-tolerant olive variety (Qaisi) to water harvesting and limited summer irrigation (200 l per tree) in an arid area (average annual rainfall of 210 mm) with Mediterranean climate in Syria. Soil moisture and growth of four-year-old trees were monitored regularly. Olive leaves were sampled at different stages to determine water content, specific mass, and N content. Stomatal conductance was also measured in 2005. Our results showed that water harvesting and summer irrigation improved soil moisture content, leaf water content (up to 36% higher in Sep. 2003), leaf N content (up to 45% higher in Aug. 2003), leaf stomatal conductance (up to 55% higher in Apr. 2005), and relative trunk growth rate. Water harvesting was most successful in wet years, although the water storage capacity was not enough to retain all harvested water. This study indicated that it is possible to grow drought-tolerant olive varieties in arid areas under little or no irrigation, but proper water and nutrient management should be considered for sustainable growth.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag (Germany)en_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.sourceEnvironment, Development and Sustainability;11,(2008) Pagination 1073,1090en_US
dc.subjectdegraded hillslopesen_US
dc.subjectsustainable water managementen_US
dc.subjectarid areasen_US
dc.subject‘qaisi’ oliveen_US
dc.titleEffect of water harvesting on growth of young olive trees in degraded Syrian drylanden_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsoil moistureen_US
cg.subject.agrovocplant water relationsen_US
cg.subject.agrovocorchardsen_US
cg.contributor.centerUniversity of Guelph - UoGen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.funderInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.projectCommunication and Documentation Information Services (CODIS)en_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-dateTimelessen_US
cg.coverage.regionWestern Asiaen_US
cg.coverage.countrySYen_US
cg.contactatubeile@uoguelph.caen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10668-008-9167-yen_US
dc.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US
mel.impact-factor0en_US


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