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dc.creatorBessette, Guyen_US
dc.date2018-12-01en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-10T23:19:16Z
dc.date.available2019-03-10T23:19:16Z
dc.identifierhttps://cgspace.cgiar.org/handle/10568/103762en_US
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/a46697de0dee6a3b7fbb25261df11ee3en_US
dc.identifier.citationGuy Bessette. (1/12/2018). Can Agricultural Citizen Science Improve Seed Systems.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/9632
dc.description.abstractUsing on-farm triadic comparisons of technologies (tricot) for crowdsourcing participatory variety selection is a new citizen–science methodology for agriculture that has been developed by Bioversity International to make it possible for large numbers of farmers to ‘massively test’ different technologies. Tricot is part of a programme known as Seeds for Needs that is implemented by Bioversity International in countries around the world. Tricot contributes to the improvement of seed systems in many ways: enriching variety recommendations, improving on-farm testing, engaging and empowering farmers, contributing to the diversification of seed systems, supporting scaling, enabling women to do their own variety selection, offering opportunities for local seed businesses and getting researchers to learn farmers’ variety preferences. Regarding tricot’s contribution to resilient seed systems, the approach contributes to strengthening local seed systems because more choices are available to adapt to climate change and because farmers are empowered to make their own choices by learning what varieties work in their specific climate zones. In terms of farmers’ engagement, the integration of gender considerations in the approach could be made more explicit, and ways to increase gender responsiveness identified. Another aspect that could be improved is the feedback given to farmers after experimentation, which, in some cases, might be omitted or limited in the handing of a sheet of summarized results to farmers.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.subjectcitizen scienceen_US
dc.subjectseed systemsen_US
dc.subjectgender-responsive participatoryen_US
dc.subjectparticipatory crop improvementen_US
dc.titleCan Agricultural Citizen Science Improve Seed Systemsen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
cg.contributor.centerIndependent / Not associateden_US
cg.contributor.crpCRP on Grain Legumes and Dryland Cereals - GLDCen_US
cg.contributor.funderCGIAR System Organization - CGIARen_US
cg.coverage.regionGlobalen_US
cg.contactgbessette3@gmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US


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