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dc.contributorTsegaye, S.en_US
dc.contributorTullu, A.en_US
dc.contributorErskine, Williamen_US
dc.creatorBejiga, Geletuen_US
dc.date2016-08-31en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-30T17:56:58Z
dc.date.available2020-10-30T17:56:58Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/dspace/limiteden_US
dc.identifier.citationGeletu Bejiga, S. Tsegaye, A. Tullu, William Erskine. (31/8/2016). Quantitave evaluation of Ethiopian landraces of lentil (Lens culinaris). Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution, 43 (4), pp. 293-301.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/11998
dc.description.abstractOne hundred and fifty-six landrace populations of lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) collected from 10 provinces in Ethiopia were evaluated for a set of six quantitative traits at three sites contrasting in altitude. Consistent regional differences among landraces were found for time to flower and maturity, 100-seed weight, number of seeds/pod and plant height. The regional differences were clarified by a discriminant analysis based on 100-seed weight, time to flower and plant height. The lentil of the West Highlands was early and short, that of the North Highlands was large-seeded, whereas lentils from the Central Highlands were the least distinctive group. Selection for seed size was the result of local human preferences. Humans were probably also responsible for the lack of adaptive value of plant phenology in relation to altitude. Selection for seed yield at the low and middle elevation sites gave a positive response to selection at both sites. However, selection for yield at the highland site did not give a positive response elsewhere, indicating that adaptation to highland conditions differed from that at lower elevations.en_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.rightsCopyrighted; all rights reserveden_US
dc.sourceGenetic Resources and Crop Evolution;43,Pagination 293,301en_US
dc.subjectLentilen_US
dc.titleQuantitave evaluation of Ethiopian landraces of lentil (Lens culinaris)en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.subject.agrovocevaluationen_US
cg.subject.agrovocethiopiaen_US
cg.subject.agrovoclentilsen_US
cg.subject.agrovoclens culinarisen_US
cg.subject.agrovoclandracesen_US
cg.contributor.centerEthiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Debere Zeit Agricultural Research Center - EIAR - DZARCen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.funderInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.projectCommunication and Documentation Information Services (CODIS)en_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-dateTimelessen_US
cg.coverage.regionGlobalen_US
cg.contactg.bejiga@cgiar.orgen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00132948en_US
dc.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US
mel.impact-factor1.071en_US


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