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dc.creatorAnderson, W.K.en_US
dc.date2003-07-01en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-03T22:32:49Z
dc.date.available2020-12-03T22:32:49Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/dspace/limiteden_US
dc.identifier.citationW. K. Anderson. (1/7/2003). Plant populations for triticale in a mediterranean environment. Field Crops Research, 8, pp. 281-295.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/12162
dc.description.abstractPlant population experiments with triticale were conducted for three seasons using a range of agronomic treatments at Aleppo, Syria. The optimum population (the population resulting in maximum grain yield) was higher under higher yielding conditions and varied between about 80 and 190 plants per m2 for grain yield levels ranging from 2.1 to 6.9 t/ha. This corresponds to optimum seed rates of from about 30 to 150 kg/ha depending upon seed size and expected field establishment. Yield at the optimum population was also strongly correlated with growing season water supply indicating that selection of a plant population that matches the expected w There was a strong positive correlation between grain yield and the length of the grain maturation period. However, since the length of this period can be severely curtailed by high atmospheric evaporative demand and reduced water supply in Mediterranean environments, selection of varieties with a reduced grain filling period could lead to a reduction in risk in triticale production. Further, yield at the optimum population was more closely related to kernel size than to tiller or spike number and was not significantly related to spike size (seeds per spike). This also demonstrates the dependence of triticale yield on conditions during the grain filling period.en_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.rightsCopyrighted; all rights reserveden_US
dc.sourceField Crops Research;8,(2003) Pagination 281,295en_US
dc.subjectgrain yielden_US
dc.subjecttriticaleen_US
dc.subjectTriticaleen_US
dc.titlePlant populations for triticale in a mediterranean environmenten_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsyriaen_US
cg.subject.agrovocplant populationen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.funderInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.projectCommunication and Documentation Information Services (CODIS)en_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-dateTimelessen_US
cg.coverage.regionWestern Asiaen_US
cg.coverage.countrySYen_US
cg.contactw.k.anderson@unknown.comen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0378-4290(84)90075-3en_US
dc.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US
mel.impact-factor4.308en_US


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