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dc.contributorMapedza, Everistoen_US
dc.contributorVan Koppen, Barbaraen_US
dc.creatorTagutanazvo, Emelder M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-01T21:29:43Z
dc.date.available2016-02-01T21:29:43Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/dspace/limiteden_US
dc.identifier.citationEmelder M. Tagutanazvo, Everisto Mapedza, Barbara Van Koppen. (31/12/2015). Gender and sustainable increase in production through irrigation: The Case of Ntcheu District, Malawi.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/3522
dc.description.abstractThe need to sustainably intensify agricultural production using irrigation dates as far back as the Egyptian civilization. In modern day Africa, irrigation offers an opportunity to get more crops per drop as a solution to global food security. The discourse on sustainable intensification has often not extended into the gender arena as it is often assumed that intensification of agriculture is gender neutral. This study made use of the Menzein-Dick’s empowerment framework to understand the link between gender, resource access and control and increased food production through irrigation particularly in matrilineal societies. Focus group discussions, key informant interviews, documentary evidence and observations were utilized to investigate the intra-household power relations manifested in production, temporal division of labour, leadership as well as in resource allocation and control and its implications on intensification. The key findings reflects that the link between access to resources in scheme settings and how resources (land, water and inputs) are controlled by men and women determines the extent to which increased food production can be met with minimum environmental impact even in situations where land tenure is rotational between the default summer-land lords and the dry season-tenants (irrigators) such as Ntcheu. This paper concludes that gendered spaces manifested in differentiated crop choices and labour investment in selected tasks by men and women indicates that gender gaps still exist in the agriculture arena particularly in irrigation schemes where cultural checks and balances are compromised.en_US
dc.formatDOCXen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.subjectsustainableen_US
dc.subjectcontrolen_US
dc.titleGender and sustainable increase in production through irrigation: The Case of Ntcheu District, Malawien_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dcterms.available2015-12-31en_US
cg.creator.idVan Koppen, Barbara: 0000-0002-7707-8127en_US
cg.subject.agrovocagricultureen_US
cg.subject.agrovocgenderen_US
cg.subject.agrovocintensificationen_US
cg.subject.agrovocirrigationen_US
cg.subject.agrovocproductionen_US
cg.subject.agrovocresourcesen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsustainable intensificationen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Water Management Institute - IWMIen_US
cg.contributor.crpCGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.contributor.funderCGIAR System Organization - CGIARen_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Water Management Institute - IWMIen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-dateTimelessen_US
cg.coverage.regionEastern Africaen_US
cg.coverage.countryMWen_US
cg.contacttemelder@gmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US


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