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dc.contributorMalano, Hectoren_US
dc.contributorDavidson, Brianen_US
dc.contributorNelson, Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributorGeorge, Biju Alummoottilen_US
dc.creatorArora, Meenakshien_US
dc.date2015-12-30en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-24T08:16:16Z
dc.date.available2016-04-24T08:16:16Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/dspace/limiteden_US
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/wat2.1099en_US
dc.identifier.citationMeenakshi Arora, Hector Malano, Brian Davidson, Rebecca Nelson, Biju Alummoottil George. (30/12/2015). Interactions between centralized and decentralized water systems in urban context: A review. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water, 2(6), pp. 623-634.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/4656
dc.description.abstractThis study presents a comprehensive review of the literature on implementation of various decentralized water systems along with centralized systems. The review highlights the benefits provided by these systems as well as various challenges posed associated with them. There are complex interactions involved within the water systems in an urban setting that are multidimensional and span over various aspects of water availability, quality, energy use, environmental, legal, economic, and social sectors. Although there are many economic, environmental, and social benefits associated with decentralized systems, there are some hidden challenges that are generally overlooked by planners and managers; these include the spatial integration of such systems, their energy intensity, social, economic, and environmental viability of these systems. Decisions to implement decentralized water systems require decision makers to consider economic, social, and environmental dimensions conjointly through an appropriate multicriteria decision analysis to select the hybrid water supply combination optimal for the given circumstances. The existing studies and tools are unable to address these factors using an integrated approach. So a holistic framework to evaluate and compare various water supply options in terms of energy use, social, economic, and environmental impacts is required to assess such systems in comprehensive manner.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherWiley (12 months)en_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.sourceWiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water;2,(2015) Pagination 623,634en_US
dc.subjectinteractionsen_US
dc.subjecturban contexten_US
dc.titleInteractions between centralized and decentralized water systems in urban context: A reviewen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.creator.ID0000-0002-8427-3350en_US
cg.creator.ID-typeORCIDen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsystemsen_US
cg.subject.agrovocwateren_US
cg.contributor.centerThe University of Melbourne, Department of Infrastructure Engineeringen_US
cg.contributor.centerThe University of Melbourne, Faculty of Veterinary Sciencesen_US
cg.contributor.centerStanford University, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environmenten_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.crpCRP on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.contributor.funderCGIAR System Office - CGIAR - Sysen_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteCRP on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-dateTimelessen_US
cg.coverage.regionGlobalen_US
cg.contactmarora@unimelb.edu.auen_US
dc.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US


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