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dc.contributorSchauer, Marken_US
dc.creatorThomas, Richarden_US
dc.date2016-09-15en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-05T20:00:48Z
dc.date.available2016-11-05T20:00:48Z
dc.identifierhttps://www.thesolutionsjournal.com/article/putting-economic-environmental-sustainability-hand-hand-protect-lands/en_US
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/scrGhSIYen_US
dc.identifier.citationRichard Thomas, Mark Schauer. (15/9/2016). Putting Economic and Environmental Sustainability Hand in Hand to Protect Our Lands. The Solutions Journal, 7(5), pp. 17-20.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/4977
dc.description.abstractLand degradation is an underestimated global concern with far-reaching implications affecting the ability of land to provide food and incomes. Globally, a large portion of the vulnerable human populations—the rural poor—live on degrading and less-favored agricultural lands without market access. Heterogeneous solutions that ensure both economic and environmental sustainability are needed at multiple scales. On a policy level, awareness of land and soil degradation is increasing. Last year all countries adopted a set of goals as part of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The specific goal on land degradation includes a commitment for countries to take steps to achieve a land-degradation neutral world. This commitment is universal; it will apply to developed as well as developing countries and covers lands with sufficient rainfalls for agriculture as well as drylands across political borders. However, a recent publication claims ‘the end of desertification’ and calls for a more nuanced approach to the serious problem of global land degradation that moves away from the emotional rhetoric of expanding deserts and sand-covered villages, forcing people to migrate into an uncertain future.1 Such doom and gloom stories dominated international discussions in the late 20th century and provided the arguments for the establishment of a UN Convention to Combat Desertification, which is now specifically addressing this issue. Others have countered this direction of thoughts with a more optimistic view of how populations can survive by building on traditional knowledge in a new paradigm for people, ecosystems, and development.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherJPR Solutionsen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.sourceThe Solutions Journal;7,(2016) Pagination 17,20en_US
dc.titlePutting Economic and Environmental Sustainability Hand in Hand to Protect Our Landsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.creator.idThomas, Richard: 0000-0002-8009-5681en_US
cg.creator.ID-typeORCIDen_US
cg.subject.agrovocenvironmenten_US
cg.subject.agrovocland degradationen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsustainabilityen_US
cg.contributor.centerCRP on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.contributor.centerEconomics of Land Degradation Initiative - ELDen_US
cg.contributor.crpCRP on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.contributor.funderDeutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit - GIZen_US
cg.contributor.projectAn Assessment of the Economics of Land Degradation for Improved Land Management in Central Asiaen_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.coverage.regionGlobalen_US
cg.contactdrrjthomas@gmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
mel.project.openhttps://mel.cgiar.org/projects/eld-central-asiaen_US


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