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dc.contributorTurkelboom, Francisen_US
dc.contributorAl-Ibrahem, Anwaren_US
dc.contributorThomas, Richarden_US
dc.contributorSultan-Tubeileh, Kholouden_US
dc.creatorTubeileh, Ashrafen_US
dc.date2014-09-14en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-10T00:26:41Z
dc.date.available2017-01-10T00:26:41Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/lh0NRg2Ten_US
dc.identifier.citationAshraf Tubeileh, Francis Turkelboom, Anwar Al-Ibrahem, Richard Thomas, Kholoud Sultan-Tubeileh. (14/9/2014). Modelling the Effects of Soil Conditions on Olive Productivity in Mediterranean Hilly Areas. International Journal of Agronomy, 2014.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/5448
dc.description.abstractThe majority of olive production in Mediterranean environments is characterized by low external inputs and is practiced in hilly areaswith shallowsoils.This study aimed to study the nutritional status for olive trees innorthwesternSyria anddetermine themost yield-affecting soil and land factors. Our methodology relied on establishing correlations between soil and land factors and fruit yield from 50 rainfed olive (Olea europaea L. cv. Zeiti) orchards under fairly similar climatic and management conditions, but with different soil and land conditions. Land and soil fertility parameters (field slope, soil depth, and soil nutrients) and concentrations of leaf minerals were determined. As olive roots can go deep in the soil profile to extract nutrients, the total available nutrients per tree (over the whole profile) were estimated. Multiple regression analyses were performed to determine the model that best accounts for yield variability. Total available soil potassium amount (R2 = 0.68), soil total N amount (R2 = 0.59), and soil depth (R2 = 0.56) had the highest correlations with olive fruit yields. Available soil potassium amount and soil depth explained together 77% of the yield variability observed. In addition to these two factors, adding leaf B and Fe concentrations to the model increased the variability explained to 83%.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherHindawi Publishing Corporationen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Agronomy;2014,(2014)en_US
dc.subjectolive productivityen_US
dc.titleModelling the Effects of Soil Conditions on Olive Productivity in Mediterranean Hilly Areasen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.creator.idThomas, Richard: 0000-0002-8009-5681en_US
cg.creator.ID-typeORCIDen_US
cg.subject.agrovocagricultureen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsoilen_US
cg.contributor.centerUniversity of Guelph - UoGen_US
cg.contributor.centerThe Research Institute for Nature and Forest - INBOen_US
cg.contributor.centerMinistry of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform, General Commission for Scientific Agricultural Research - MoAAR - GCSARen_US
cg.contributor.centerCRP on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.contributor.crpCRP on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.contributor.funderNot Applicableen_US
cg.coverage.regionWestern Asiaen_US
cg.coverage.countrySYen_US
cg.contactatubeile@uoguelph.caen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/672123en_US
dc.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US


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