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dc.contributorSoriano, Junelen_US
dc.contributorTabien, Rodanteen_US
dc.contributorChen, Kunen_US
dc.creatorDou, Fugenen_US
dc.date2016-03-15en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-08T23:01:18Z
dc.date.available2017-02-08T23:01:18Z
dc.identifierhttp://oar.icrisat.org/id/eprint/9464en_US
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/nK5rqkLgen_US
dc.identifier.citationFugen Dou, Junel Soriano, Rodante Tabien, Kun Chen. (15/3/2016). Soil Texture and Cultivar Effects on Rice (Oryza sativa, L. ) Grain Yield, Yield Components and Water Productivity in Three Water Regimes. PLOS ONE, 11(3), pp. 1-12.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/5592
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this study was to determine the effects of water regime/soil condition (continuous flooding, saturated, and aerobic), cultivar (‘Cocodrie’ and ‘Rondo’), and soil texture (clay and sandy loam) on rice grain yield, yield components and water productivity using a greenhouse trial. Rice grain yield was significantly affected by soil texture and the interaction between water regime and cultivar. Significantly higher yield was obtained in continuous flooding than in aerobic and saturated soil conditions but the latter treatments were comparable to each other. For Rondo, its grain yield has decreased with soil water regimes in the order of continuous flooding, saturated and aerobic treatments. The rice grain yield in clay soil was 46% higher than in sandy loam soil averaged across cultivar and water regime. Compared to aerobic condition, saturated and continuous flooding treatments had greater panicle numbers. In addition, panicle number in clay soil was 25% higher than in sandy loam soil. The spikelet number of Cocodrie was 29% greater than that of Rondo, indicating that rice cultivar had greater effect on spikelet number than soil type and water management. Water productivity was significantly affected by the interaction of water regime and cultivar. Compared to sandy loam soil, clay soil was 25% higher in water productivity. Our results indicated that cultivar selection and soil texture are important factors in deciding what water management option to practice.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLOS ONE)en_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.sourcePLOS ONE;11,(2016) Pagination 1,12en_US
dc.subjectwater regimeen_US
dc.subjectsoil conditionen_US
dc.subjectgrain yielden_US
dc.titleSoil Texture and Cultivar Effects on Rice (Oryza sativa, L.) Grain Yield, Yield Components and Water Productivity in Three Water Regimesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.subject.agrovocwater managementen_US
cg.subject.agrovocriceen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsoil textureen_US
cg.contributor.centerTexas A&M University - TAMUen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics - ICRISATen_US
cg.contributor.centerUniversity of Connecticut - UCONNen_US
cg.contributor.crpCRP on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.contributor.funderNot Applicableen_US
cg.coverage.regionGlobalen_US
cg.contactf-dou@aesrg.tamu.eduen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0150549en_US
dc.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US
mel.impact-factor3.057en_US


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