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dc.contributorMakate, Marshallen_US
dc.contributorMango, Nelsonen_US
dc.creatorMakate, Cliftonen_US
dc.date2017-03-15en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-05T22:39:11Z
dc.date.available2017-04-05T22:39:11Z
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci6010030en_US
dc.identifierhttps://cgspace.cgiar.org/handle/10568/80447en_US
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/reporting/download/hash/6rLAB233en_US
dc.identifier.citationClifton Makate, Marshall Makate, Nelson Mango. (15/3/2017). Smallholder Farmers’ Perceptions on Climate Change and the Use of Sustainable Agricultural Practices in the Chinyanja Triangle, Southern Africa. Social Sciences, 6(30), pp. 1-14.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/6591
dc.description.abstractIn developing regions with high levels of poverty and a dependence on climate sensitive agriculture, studies focusing on climate change adaptation, planning, and policy processes, have gained relative importance over the years. This study assesses the impact of farmer perceptions regarding climate change on the use of sustainable agricultural practices as an adaptation strategy in the Chinyanja Triangle, Southern Africa. In this empirical approach, we adopt methods that account for the plausibility that unmeasured characteristics exist, which are correlated with perceptions and the adoption of Sustainable Agricultural Practices. We use a unique and representative dataset collected in December 2012 and June 2013, from smallholder farmers in the Chinyanja Triangle. The results indicate that farmer’s perceptions significantly influence the use of sustainable agricultural practices. Specifically, we established that farmer perceptions considerably impact the use of grain legume rotations, inorganic fertilizers, compost, and farmyard manure. Our results highlight the need for a serious and perhaps equal consideration of farmer perceptions regarding climate change, as important inputs to climate change adaptation policies targeted at enhancing climatic resilience in smallholder farming communities. This is plausible as the adaptation and pliability of farmers to the effects of climate change should be a social process involving the collective efforts from various stakeholders.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.sourceSocial Sciences ;6,(2017) Pagination 1,14en_US
dc.subjectfarmer perceptionsen_US
dc.subjectsustainable agriculture practices (saps)en_US
dc.subjectimpacten_US
dc.titleSmallholder Farmers’ Perceptions on Climate Change and the Use of Sustainable Agricultural Practices in the Chinyanja Triangle, Southern Africaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.subject.agrovocclimate change adaptationen_US
cg.subject.agrovocsouthern africaen_US
cg.contributor.centerTongji Universityen_US
cg.contributor.centerState University of New York at Albanyen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Tropical Agriculture - CIATen_US
cg.contributor.crpCRP on Dryland Systems - DSen_US
cg.contributor.funderNot Applicableen_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Tropical Agriculture - CIATen_US
cg.coverage.regionEastern Africaen_US
cg.coverage.countryMWen_US
cg.coverage.countryMZen_US
cg.coverage.countryZMen_US
cg.contactruumakate@live.comen_US
dc.identifier.statusOpen accessen_US


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