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dc.contributorThavarajah, Pushparajahen_US
dc.contributorSarker, Ashutoshen_US
dc.contributorVandenberg, Alberten_US
dc.creatorThavarajah, Dilen_US
dc.date2009-05-22en_US
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-12T20:42:26Z
dc.date.available2022-04-12T20:42:26Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/dspace/limiteden_US
dc.identifier.citationDil Thavarajah, Pushparajah Thavarajah, Ashutosh Sarker, Albert Vandenberg. (22/5/2009). Lentils (Lens culinaris Medikus Subspecies culinaris): A Whole Food for Increased Iron and Zinc Intake. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 57 (12), pp. 5413-5419.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/67323
dc.description.abstractMicronutrient malnutrition, the hidden hunger, affects more than 40% of the world's population, and a majority of them are in South and South East Asia and Africa. This study was carried out to determine the potential for iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) biofortification of lentils (Lens culinaris Medikus subsp. culinaris) to improve human nutrition. Lentils are a common and quick-cooking nutritious staple pulse in many developing countries. We analyzed the total Fe and Zn concentrations of 19 lentil genotypes grown at eight locations for 2 years in Saskatchewan, Canada. It was observed that some genetic variation exists for Fe and Zn concentrations among the lentil lines tested. The total Fe and Zn concentrations ranged from 73 to 90 mg of Fe kg(-1) and from 44 to 54 mg of Zn kg(-1). The calculated percentages of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for Fe and Zn were within the RDA ranges from a 100 g serving of dry lentils. Broad-sense heritability estimates for Fe and Zn concentrations in lentil seed were 64 and 68%, respectively. It was concluded that lentils have great potential as a whole food source of Fe and Zn for people affected by these nutrient deficiencies. This is the first report on the genetic basis for Fe and Zn micronutrient content in lentils. These results provide some understanding of the genetic basis of Fe and Zn concentrations and will allow for the development of potential strategies for genetic biofortification.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Societyen_US
dc.rightsCopyrighted; all rights reserveden_US
dc.sourceJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry;57,(2009) Pagination 5413,5419en_US
dc.subjectLentilen_US
dc.titleLentils (Lens culinaris Medikus Subspecies culinaris): A Whole Food for Increased Iron and Zinc Intakeen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.creator.idSarker, Ashutosh: 0000-0002-9074-4876en_US
cg.creator.ID-typeORCIDen_US
cg.subject.agrovoczincen_US
cg.subject.agrovoclentilsen_US
cg.subject.agrovocbiofortificationen_US
cg.subject.agrovocironen_US
cg.contributor.centerUniversity of Saskatchewan - USASKen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.funderInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.projectCommunication and Documentation Information Services (CODIS)en_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-dateTimelessen_US
cg.coverage.regionGlobalen_US
cg.contactbert.vandenberg@usask.caen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf900786een_US
dc.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US
mel.impact-factor5.279en_US


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