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dc.contributorCarpinelli, Michaelen_US
dc.contributorRichman, Lesleyen_US
dc.contributorJohnson, Douglas E.en_US
dc.creatorLouhaichi, Mouniren_US
dc.date2012-02-29en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-27T21:53:38Z
dc.date.available2019-02-27T21:53:38Z
dc.identifierhttps://mel.cgiar.org/dspace/limiteden_US
dc.identifier.citationMounir Louhaichi, Michael Carpinelli, Lesley Richman, Douglas E. Johnson. (29/2/2012). Native forb response to sulfometuron methyl on medusahead-invaded rangeland in Eastern Oregon. Rangeland Journal, 34 (1), pp. 47-53.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11766/9570
dc.description.abstractinvaded rangelands throughout the western USA. Medusahead is an aggressive competitor that crowds out native plants and reduces forage for wildlife and livestock. Sulfometuron methyl is a sulfonylurea herbicide used to control medusahead, but its effect on non-target native forbs is largely unknown. We assessed the impact of an autumn application of sulfometuron methyl on native forbs on the sagebrush/bunchgrass steppe of eastern Oregon over 3 years. We applied 70 g a.i./ha (1.0 oz. a.i./acre) of sulfometuron methyl to randomly selected locations on three sites in a split-plot-in-time (repeated-measures) experimental design. Three years after treatment, 6 of the 11 forb species studied had a significant reduction in density (P < 0.05), with densities ranging from 3 to 60% of the pre-treatment levels. The results of this study suggest that the benefit of medusahead control by sulfometuron methyl should be weighed against the damage to non-target species.en_US
dc.formatPDFen_US
dc.languageenen_US
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishingen_US
dc.rightsCC-BY-NC-4.0en_US
dc.sourceRangeland Journal;34,(2012) Pagination 47,53en_US
dc.subjectvegmeasureen_US
dc.subjectgreat basinen_US
dc.subjectinvasive annual grassen_US
dc.subjectnon-targeten_US
dc.subjectousten_US
dc.subjecttaeniatherum caput-medusaen_US
dc.titleNative forb response to sulfometuron methyl on medusahead-invaded rangeland in Eastern Oregonen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
cg.creator.idLouhaichi, Mounir: 0000-0002-4543-7631en_US
cg.creator.ID-typeORCIDen_US
cg.subject.agrovocimage processingen_US
cg.subject.agrovocpopulation dynamicsen_US
cg.contributor.centerOregon State University - OSU United Statesen_US
cg.contributor.centerInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.centerUnited States Department of Agriculture, US Forest Service - USDA-USFSen_US
cg.contributor.centerBureau of Land Management - BLMen_US
cg.contributor.funderInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.contributor.projectCommunication and Documentation Information Services (CODIS)en_US
cg.contributor.project-lead-instituteInternational Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas - ICARDAen_US
cg.date.embargo-end-dateTimelessen_US
cg.coverage.regionNorthern Americaen_US
cg.coverage.countryUSen_US
cg.contactm.louhaichi@cgiar.orgen_US
cg.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1071/RJ11021en_US
dc.identifier.statusTimeless limited accessen_US
mel.impact-factor1.08en_US


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